All Things Dark and Beautiful

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Courage is more exhilarating than fear and in the long run it is easier. We do not have to become heroes overnight. Just a step at a time, meeting each thing that comes up, seeing it is not as dreadful as it appeared, discovering we have the strength to stare it down.

- Eleanor Roosevelt. (via corrinalawson)

One of many beautiful grave markers found at Holy Cross Cemetery in Detroit. This person is no relation; I just thought it was a touching scene. I plan to go back and take more photos soon.

One of many beautiful grave markers found at Holy Cross Cemetery in Detroit. This person is no relation; I just thought it was a touching scene. I plan to go back and take more photos soon.

After recently finding my Grandma Livernois’ address in the 1940 census, I was able to visit the house today. It’s on 24th Street in Detroit. (Previous census post here: http://msjulie73.tumblr.com/post/97325893886/my-grandma-livernois-c-1940s-in-detroit-the)

There was a man working on his car in the street outside the neighbor’s white house when we drove by. I asked him if we could take photos. I showed him the photo of my Grandma outside the house in 1940. He said it was cool. His wife came out and said their house was 100 years old. Very nice, very friendly couple. We didn’t see anyone in the house my Grandma lived in, though it was clearly occupied. We just took some photos outside. Both houses are extremely large, built for 2 families. With 8 kids in one house I guess it had to be large.

Despite some burned out houses in the area, the ones in this particular section were mostly nice and there was a very happy, sweet vibe here. The houses across the street were torn down so it gave the area an open, country-esque feel. To the left of this photo was a large fenced garden where a house once stood. I was very happy to see people living in these houses and clearly enjoying them.

Today we also toured other areas of Detroit where other Grandparents and Great-Grandparents had lived (Lawndale, Military, Horatio, Wesson). This is the only spot where a house was still standing. The others were all empty lots.

I was with my dad and he was craving chili from Armandos in Mexican Town. He bought 3 extra batches of chili to take home and freeze. Crazy!!! (I thought the food was ok, but I’ve been told to try Mi Pueblo on Dix for really great food. Next time!)  I enjoyed all his reminisces and stories throughout the day, especially when he told me he used to walk across the Ambassador Bridge to Canada for a dime. He once walked home from the bridge when he was 14 or 15; an 11 mile trek back to Warrendale. Times have a-changed for sure.

We spent the morning at Holy Cross cemetery on Dix finding my Great- and Great-Great-Grandparents’ headstones. The stones had been hidden and buried under 3 inches of grass and dirt so I was quite disheveled and discombobulated in this photo. But oh well, great photo op. Vanity schmanity. I’m standing where my Grandma stood over 70 years ago.

My ideal couple

(Source: lovegoods)

fuckyeahneedlework:

stitchingsanity:

Advanced Fine Whitework, Diploma - Lianne Hart

!!!!!!

fuckyeahneedlework:

stitchingsanity:

Advanced Fine Whitework, Diploma - Lianne Hart

!!!!!!

notluvulongtime:

~ Rupert Graves as Lt. Colonel Robert Greville and Amanda Donohoe as Lady Elizabeth Pembroke, The Madness of King George (1994)

Continuing my obsession with Czech glass beads, I came upon this blog by Wild Thing Beads. They chronicled a recent trip to the Czech Republic to tour factories and buy beads (sounds heavenly): http://wildthingsbeads131.blogspot.com/2014/05/may-16-very-busy-day-today-seeing-many.html
This video shows ” the last remaining glass button pressing hut in Czech Republic, located in Smrzovka. We were able to watch buttons being pressed and ground by the last two button pressers alive. Once they retire, new button production will be over.”
"The last two button pressers alive" just sounds so sad.
I’ve been reading about the Czech bead industry and it seems they are having a hard time competing with cheaply made beads from China.  Also, they’ve had longstanding issues with order fulfillment, in addition to worldwide distribution problems. Many skilled German beadmakers were expelled from the country after WWII, which also contributed to the industry’s decline.
There is also a history of prisoners making glass beads. I read an account of a man showing up at a bead show to buy samples of the beads he’d made in prison to show his family.
Another fascinating tidbit:
A lot of the stringing used to be done in homes. Many times the beads that didn’t make the cut were scattered in gardens, placed in driveways or even buried in the foundations of buildings.
One such driveway:

^This photo is from another very informative blog, which really addresses the hardships facing the industry today: http://beadmuseum.wordpress.com/2010/10/17/a-city-with-a-heart-of-beads-jablonec-nad-nisou/
I wonder if I’ll ever have enough beads to make a bead driveway?

Continuing my obsession with Czech glass beads, I came upon this blog by Wild Thing Beads. They chronicled a recent trip to the Czech Republic to tour factories and buy beads (sounds heavenly): http://wildthingsbeads131.blogspot.com/2014/05/may-16-very-busy-day-today-seeing-many.html

This video shows ” the last remaining glass button pressing hut in Czech Republic, located in Smrzovka. We were able to watch buttons being pressed and ground by the last two button pressers alive. Once they retire, new button production will be over.”

"The last two button pressers alive" just sounds so sad.

I’ve been reading about the Czech bead industry and it seems they are having a hard time competing with cheaply made beads from China.  Also, they’ve had longstanding issues with order fulfillment, in addition to worldwide distribution problems. Many skilled German beadmakers were expelled from the country after WWII, which also contributed to the industry’s decline.

There is also a history of prisoners making glass beads. I read an account of a man showing up at a bead show to buy samples of the beads he’d made in prison to show his family.

Another fascinating tidbit:

A lot of the stringing used to be done in homes. Many times the beads that didn’t make the cut were scattered in gardens, placed in driveways or even buried in the foundations of buildings.

One such driveway:

^This photo is from another very informative blog, which really addresses the hardships facing the industry today: http://beadmuseum.wordpress.com/2010/10/17/a-city-with-a-heart-of-beads-jablonec-nad-nisou/

I wonder if I’ll ever have enough beads to make a bead driveway?

bookmania:

from The Art of Power by Thich Nhat Hanh

bookmania:

from The Art of Power by Thich Nhat Hanh

A great fire burns within me, but no one stops to warm themselves at it, and passers-by only see a wisp of smoke.

- Vincent Van Gogh (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: psych-facts)

novelemon:

ahguzelistanbul:

Rüstem Paşa Camii Çinileri-İstanbul

By 

Wonderful.